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Game Analysis

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In addition to methods for analyzing individual positions, Rybka Aquarium offers two different methods for full game analysis: Find Blunders and Game Analysis. Find Blunders is intended for quick analysis to search for major blunders in a game. Game Analysis, on the other hand, is an advanced analysis method which does a complete analysis of the game.

Game Analysis
The Game Analysis settings dialog is displayed when you click the small, downward pointing triangle at the bottom of the Game Analysis button. Here you can specify all the parameters for the analysis.

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Time for game analysis is the approximate analysis time (minutes) that will be used for each game.

When time is up allows you to decide if the the maximum analysis time should be strictly observed or if analysis should be allowed to continue when the maximum is reached.

Do not analyze when score is above allows you to specify a limit in centipawns. If, in the final phase of the game, the evaluation reaches this limit the rest of the moves are not analyzed deeply. This can be used to minimize the amount of time spent on analyzing totally won positions.

The Commenting options pane controls how the variations found during analysis are added to the notation. No variation will be longer than the Maximum variation length. The variations produced by chess engines can be quite long and the first moves of the variation are usually more accurate than later moves. The Untrusted engine halfmoves specifies how many moves should be cut off the end of the engine variations. The number of variations that Game Analysis adds to the notation will never exceed Maximum total variations. Setting it to zero allows Game Analysis to decide how many variations will be added.

Opening database (CDP) specifies a CDP format database that will be used for inserting reference games into the opening phase of the game.

Discard previous analysis tells Game Analysis to start the analysis from scratch. Otherwise Game Analysis checks if some previous analysis exists. If it does, then the analysis continues from where it left off.

When you have set all the parameters, click the Start button to start the analysis or Save if you only want to save the parameters.

Find Blunders
The Find Blunders settings dialog is displayed when you click the small, downward pointing triangle at the bottom of the Find Blunders button. Here you can specify all the parameters for the analysis.

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Find Blunders is intended for a quick search for critical blunders in a game, so you should set the parameters accordingly. For longer and more detailed analysis use Game Analysis.

First pass. The first pass of Find Blunders analyzes each position in the game after the opening. Here you can specify how long/deep each position is analyzed. You can specify both time and depth.

Second pass (verification). In the second pass, moves which seem to be blunders are analyzed further. You should give more time for the analysis in the second pass.

Thorough blunder check does additional analysis of mistakes during the second pass. In addition to analyzing the position after the best move, the position where the mistake was made and the position after the blunder are also analyzed.

Commenting options determine which moves are considered blunders and how they are commented on in the notation. Moves where the best move found by the engine deviates less than Minimum delta (centipawns) from the move actually played are not considered blunders. If the deviation is bigger than that is must also exceed Minimum delta (percents) to qualify as a blunder. This is a parameter which estimates how much the blunder affects the winning chances. Example: If the score increases from +9 to +10 this change in evaluation is irrelevant to the outcome of the game. The probability that the side which has the advantage will win is almost 100% in both cases. So moves likes these will not be classified as blunders. If, however, the evaluation changes from 0 to +1 it has great effect on the winning probabilities and so the move causing this jump will be classified as a blunder.

No variation inserted in the notation following a blunder will be longer than the Maximum variation length. The variations produced by chess engines can be quite long and the first moves of the variation are usually more accurate than later moves. The Untrusted engine halfmoves specifies how many moves should be cut off the end of the engine variations. The number of variations that Find Blunders adds to the notation will never exceed Maximum total variations. Setting it to zero allows Find Blunders to decide how many variations should be added.